News & Events

Shorttakes

February 2009 (historical)

A compilation of news from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). Published three times a year. Just scan these "shorttakes" for information on what's happening at NIAMS, or access the complete articles for viewing or use in your own newsletter or other publication.

From the Director . . .

In 2008, NIAMS began developing a new long-range plan for fiscal years 2010-2014 to provide a broad outline of opportunities and needs related to the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately, prevention of diseases within the Institute's mission areas. The new long-range plan is not meant to replace the previous plan but, instead, to continue to promote exploration of ideas and encourage new research directions, as needed.

As part of the planning process, NIAMS hosted a series of roundtable discussions in November and December 2008 to get input and guidance from the scientific community about areas of research to include in the new plan. The roundtables were organized around five tissue- and disease-specific themes:

  • Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases
  • Bone Biology and Diseases
  • Muscle Biology and Diseases
  • Musculoskeletal Biology and Diseases
  • Skin Biology and Diseases.

Information gathered from these discussions, along with input received from other members of the scientific community, patient and professional organizations, and the public via a web-based Request for Comments, is being used to shape the new plan. Additional opportunities for various communities to provide input will be available throughout the development process before the final plan is presented to the NIAMS Advisory Council in September 2009.

While NIAMS will continue to devote the majority of its extramural budget toward funding the best investigator-initiated research ideas, we also must continue to rise to the challenge of serving the scientific community in the best possible way. By providing a broad scientific outline, through our long-range plan, we are able to bring attention to many of the areas that need to be addressed in the coming years in order to propel research progress and improve the health of the American public.

Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D.
Director
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institutes of Health

Research Watch . . .

NIAMS-supported scientists have discovered a mechanism that contributes to differentiation of skin cells during normal skin growth. Understanding the processes that regulate normal skin growth and control the balance between skin cell growth and differentiation may provide a better understanding of and lead to the development of therapies for diseases such as eczema and skin cancer.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2009/skin_balance.asp

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health discovered a new explanation for the flexibility of responses of one type of immune system cell, called T lymphocytes, using a new genome sequencing technology that surveys the cells' epigenomes.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2009/helper_t_cell.asp

Meniscal tears may or may not be associated with knee pain.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2009/meniscus_tears.asp

Scientists at NIAMS, led by Juan Rivera, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers at the University of Udine in Italy, have found that communication between two immune system cells can decrease allergic responses in mice.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2009/immu_allerg_react.asp

The dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, together or alone, appeared to fare no better than placebo in slowing loss of cartilage in osteoarthritis of the knee according to the research team from the Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT).
Full story: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2008/nccam-29.htm

Jumping exercises for just one school year in early childhood can trigger increases in bone mineral density (BMD) that are sustained for several years.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2008/bugsy_exercise.asp

Researchers funded by NIAMS have developed a non-invasive test for osteoarthritis. Their discovery holds promise for interventions to preserve joint function in individuals identified at early stages of the disease.
Full story: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Spotlight_on_Research/2008/noninvasive_test.asp

NIAMS has selected 11 projects for the first Building Interdisciplinary Research Teams (BIRT) awards. The BIRT awards are designed to promote collaborations among groups of investigators in disciplines that have not traditionally interacted.
See: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Announcements/2008/birt.asp

NIAMS began developing a new long-range plan for fiscal years 2010-2014 to provide a broad outline of opportunities and needs related to the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately, prevention of diseases within the Institute's mission areas. As part of this process, the NIAMS hosted a series of roundtable discussions to get input and guidance from the scientific community about areas of research to include in the new plan.
See: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Meetings_and_Events/Roundtables/2008/overview.asp

NIAMS announces the availability of biological specimens from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. See: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Funding/Funded_Research/Osteoarthritis_Initiative/oai_biospecimen.asp

Grants and Contracts . . .

The following announcements related to the NIAMS appeared in recent issues of the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts. These announcements are made to the research community to express our interest in funding specific areas of research. For more information on NIAMS grants and contracts, visit the NIAMS Web site at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Funding/ and the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html.

Requests for Applications (Roadmap):

Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information SystemTM (PROMIS) Network Center (U54), RFA-RM-08-022. Issued: September 26, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: February 3, 2009; application receipt date: March 03, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-08-022.html

Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information SystemTM (PROMIS) Research Sites (U01) RFA-RM-08-023. Issued: September 26, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: February 3, 2009; application receipt date: March 03, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-08-023.html

Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information SystemTM (PROMIS) Technology Center (U54), RFA-RM-08-024. Issued: September 26, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: February 3, 2009; application receipt date: March 03, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-08-024.html

Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information SystemTM (PROMIS) Statistical Center (U54), RFA-RM-08-025. Issued: September 26, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: February 3, 2009; application receipt date: March 03, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-08-025.html

2009 NIH Director's Pioneer Award Program (DP1), RFA-RM-09-001. Issued: October 27, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt date: May 15, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-09-001.html

2009 NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2), RFA-RM-09-003. Issued: October 27, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt date: May 27, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-09-003.html

New Methodologies for Natural Products Chemistry (R01), RFA-RM-09-005. Issued: December 10, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: April 17, 2009; application receipt date: May 14, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-09-005.html

Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award (U54), RFA-RM-09-004. Issued: January 7, 2009; letters of intent receipt date: September 14, 2009; application receipt date: October 14, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-09-004.html

Program Announcements:

Innovation in Molecular Imaging Probes (R01), PAR-09-016. Issued: November 18, 2008; letters of intent receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-016.html

NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03), PAR-09-031. Issued: December 4, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt date: October 24, 2011.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-031.html

Mid-career Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24), PA-09-037. Issued: December 11, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-037.html

Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award (K25), PA-09-039. Issued: December 11, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-039.html

Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01), PA-09-040. Issued: December 11, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-040.html

Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award (K08), PA-09-042. Issued: December 11, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-042.html

Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23), PA-09-043. Issued: December 11, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-043.html

NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00), PA-09-036. Issued: December 12, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-036.html

PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF for Small Business Innovation Research Grant Applications (Parent SBIR [R43/R44]), PA-09-080. Issued: January 22, 2009; letters of intent receipt dates: not applicable; application receipt dates: standard dates apply, see http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/submissionschedule.htm.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-080.html

PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH for Small Business Technology Transfer Grant Applications (Parent STTR [R41/R42]), PA-09-081. Issued: January 22, 2009; letters of intent receipt dates: not applicable; application receipt dates: standard dates apply, see http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/submissionschedule.htm.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-081.html

Program Announcements (Roadmap):

Pre-Application for the 2009 NIH Director's Pioneer Award Program (X02), PAR-09-012. Issued: October 23, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt date: December 17, 2008.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-012.html

Pre-Application for the 2009 NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (X02), PAR-09-013. Issued: October 23, 2008; letters of intent receipt date: not applicable; application receipt date: January 15, 2009.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-013.html

National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development (NIH-RAID) Program (X01), PAR-09-027. Issued: November 14, 2008; letters of intent receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement; application receipt dates: multiple dates, see announcement.
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-027.html

Highlights From the Hill, DHHS and NIH . . .

Arthritis

On September 27, 2008, the House passed H.R. 1283, the Arthritis Prevention, Control and Cure Act. The bill was introduced by Representative Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA) and authorizes the Secretary of HHS, in coordination with the Director of NIH, to expand and intensify the agency's programs with respect to research and related activities concerning various forms of juvenile arthritis and related conditions. The bill was received in the Senate on September 27. No further action has occurred.

Autoimmunity

On September 25, 2008, Representative Patrick I. Kennedy (D-RI) introduced H.R. 7078, the Prevention, Awareness, and Research of Autoimmune Diseases Act of 2008. If passed, the bill would require the NIH to award grants for research on environmental triggers of autoimmune diseases; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to award grants for public and professional awareness activities regarding autoimmune diseases. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) would be required to support the education of health care providers on potential links between autoimmune diseases and cognitive and mood disorders, such as depression, as well as establish an educational loan repayment program for physicians agreeing to conduct research on autoimmune diseases. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. No further action has occurred.

Comparative Effectiveness Research

On July 31, Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) introduced S. 3408, the Comparative Effectiveness Research Act of 2008. The bill would establish a nonprofit corporation called the Health Care Comparative Effectiveness Research Institute to contract with appropriate Federal agencies or the private sector to conduct research in this area. The bill was referred to the Committee on Finance. While no further action has occurred, members of both the House and Senate have expressed an interest in the benefits of comparative effectiveness research, and how it could shape the future of health care.

Muscular Dystrophy

On October 8, President George W. Bush signed the Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Community Assistance, Research, and Education (MD-CARE) Amendments of 2008 (P.L. 110-361). The bill officially named the muscular dystrophy centers of excellence as the Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative Research Centers. In addition, the Muscular Dystrophy Coordinating Committee was authorized to give special consideration to enhance the clinical research infrastructure to test emerging therapies for the various forms of muscular dystrophy.

Stem Cell Research

On September 26, Representative Diana L. DeGette (D-CO) introduced H.R. 7140, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act of 2008. The bill would require the Secretary of HHS to conduct and support research using human embryonic stem cells regardless of the date on which the stem cells were derived from a human embryo, providing that certain ethical requirements are met. The bill would also require the Director of NIH to develop guidelines governing such research within 90 days of enactment. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Economic Impact of NIH Funding

On November 13, Acting NIH Director, Raynard Kington, M.D., Ph.D., spoke before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce's Subcommittee on Health, at a hearing entitled, "Treatments for an Ailing Economy: Protecting Health Care Coverage and Investing in Biomedical Research." This hearing was called, in part, to discuss the merits of including NIH funding in future economic stimulus packages. Key points included:

  • NIH funding to universities results in: job creation (average 7 per grant); discoveries leading to new companies; and innovations leading to lower national health costs.
  • According to the Families USA report entitled, "In Your Own Backyard," the economic benefit of the NIH is as high as $2.50 in economic growth for every $1 of funding.
  • 10,000 grants have been scientifically approved, yet are without funding. Since the granting infrastructure already exists at the NIH, no additional administrative costs would be necessary to fund these projects within 4-6 weeks.
  • Many grants go to universities and result in immediate hiring. Then the universities seek matching funds from states and businesses.

House and Senate Committee Updates

Representative Henry A. Waxman (D-CA), formerly the chair of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, has been appointed chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, replacing Representative John Dingell (D-MI). Representative David Obey (D-WI) remains the chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies, while Representative Todd Tiahrt (R-KS) has been selected as the ranking member. Representative Tiahrt previously was the ranking member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies.

For more information on these and other legislative actions that impact the NIH, please visit the NIH's Office of Legislative Policy and Analysis at http://olpa.od.nih.gov/.

Budget Update

FY 2008

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, the NIAMS funded 253 new and competing continuation applications for a success rate of 20.9 percent — a figure slightly higher than last year's rate of 20 percent. The overall NIH success rate was 21.8 percent. Additional details about the distribution of the FY 2008 appropriation, including success rates for all budget activities are available on the NIAMS Web site at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/

FY 2009

On September 30, 2008, President George W. Bush signed into law the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 110-329, HR2638), the FY 2009 continuing resolution (CR) to fund most of the government until March 6, 2009. For NIH, this CR provides funding at the same rate as the 2008 Consolidated Appropriations Act, not including the $150 million from the FY 2008 supplemental. This bill will provide funding to NIH at the annualized rate of $29 billion. The funding level for NIAMS under the CR is $508.6 million, which is essentially level with the FY 2008 budget without the supplemental funds.

An interim funding plan has been developed for operations under the CR and is available on the NIAMS Web site at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/About_Us/Budget/funding_plan_fy2009.asp

Specific funding policies for FY 2009 will not be known until an appropriations bill is passed. In the meantime, support for new investigators remains an important NIH goal, and as in past years, each IC has been given a numeric target; the FY 2009 goal for NIAMS is 47. This year's target is higher than in previous years due to a change in the methodology for developing the goals. The previous method was essentially the average number of new investigators previously funded over the past several years; the new goal is a distribution based on numbers of funded type 1 R01s. Furthermore, the emphasis will be less on reaching the numeric target and more on striving to have comparable success rates between new and established type 1 investigators.

A second NIH-wide new investigator emphasis area is increasing the numbers of Early Stage Investigators (ESIs). An ESI is an individual within 10 years of completing the terminal research degree or within 10 years of completing medical residency, without past NIH support. NIH recently established the ESI designation as a way to encourage researchers in their early careers to transition to independent careers more rapidly and receive an R01 earlier. NIH expects that ESIs will constitute a majority of new investigators in FY 2009, with incremental increases each year over the next few years such that 75 percent of new investigators are ESIs in FY 2012.

To review the NIH policy on new and early stage investigators, please see NOT-OD-09-913 at the following web link: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-013.html
To help improve our new investigator success rate and reach our goal, the NIAMS is currently allowing a 3 percent payline differential for applications from new investigators.

On January 15, 2009, NIH released the Research, Condition, and Disease Categorization (RCDC) system - a new and different way to categorize and report the NIH research portfolio. RCDC includes 215 historically reported research categories, covering grants data, interagency agreements, contracts, and intramural research projects and provides, for the first time, complete project listings and associated dollars for each category. For additional information on the RCDC process and links to view the available categories, please visit the NIH RePORT Web Site at: http://report.nih.gov/rcdc/

FY 2010

The President's Budget request for FY 2010 is anticipated in the near future. Details will be shared on the NIAMS and NIH Office of Budget Web Sites as soon as they become available.

NIAMS Faces . . .

The NIAMS Advisory Council welcomes four ad hoc members: Leslie Crofford, M.D., Chief of the Division of Rheumatology and Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics at the University of Kentucky, Lexington. Dr. Crofford also serves as the university's Director of the Center for the Advancement of Women's Health; Karen Evans, Executive Director of the Will and Jada Smith Family Foundation, a private organization dedicated to the improvement of the lives of youth and their families in Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles. Ms. Evans is also the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Lupus Foundation of America; Linda Griffith, Ph.D., Director of the Biotechnology Process Engineering Center and a Professor of Mechanical and Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Dr. Griffith is recognized as an expert in the fields of tissue engineering and regeneration, and in the development of biomaterials. She is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Society of Cell Biology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and Henry Kronenberg, M.D., Professor of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Endocrine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Dr. Kronenberg is a member of numerous professional associations, including the Endocrine Society, the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, and the International Bone and Mineral Society.

The Institute has appointed Melinda Nelson as the new Acting Director of the NIAMS Division of Extramural Research Activities (DERA).

NIAMS thanks Glen Nuckolls, Ph.D., for an outstanding job and dedicated service as the Acting DERA Director since the passing of our colleague, Dr. Madeline Turkeltaub, in June 2008.

The Institute welcomes Hung Tseng, Ph.D., who joined the NIAMS Extramural Program as a Health Science Administrator. Dr. Tseng had been a faculty member at the Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania for 14 years. He received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his undergraduate degree in Biology from Peking University (China).

Kudos . . .

Daniel Kastner, M.D., Ph.D., Chief of the NIAMS Office of the Clinical Director, has accepted an additional role at NIH as the Deputy Director for Intramural Clinical Research, NIH Office of Intramural Research.

Janet S. Austin, Ph.D., Director of the NIAMS Office of Communications and Public Liaison (OCPL), received the Addie Thomas Service Award from the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP) at its annual scientific meeting in San Francisco on October 25, 2008. The award, named in honor of the Association's first president, recognizes an individual who has been an active volunteer involved with local, regional, and national arthritis-related activities.

The NIAMS, led by Luis Arvelo, Emergency Coordinator, and Sharon Glass, Back-up Emergency Coordinator, was recognized by the NIH Office of Research Services for providing outstanding leadership and direction in developing and maintaining the NIAMS emergency management/crisis response program. The program is critical in assuring continuity of operations for both the NIAMS and the NIH during emergency situations impacting the agency.

NIAMS Communications Update

Multicultural Outreach

National Multicultural Outreach Initiative

NIAMS is in the planning stages of a National Multicultural Outreach Initiative to improve access to research-based and culturally relevant health information for minority and underserved populations. The Initiative will emphasize research as the foundation for progress in achieving better bone, joint, muscle and skin health, and will support and involve the voluntary and professional organizations within the NIAMS Coalition in multicultural outreach. The first phase of the Initiative will include development and dissemination of broad, cross-cutting multicultural health messages and materials; later phases will emphasize tailored health messages and materials for specific target populations.

Outreach to American Indians and Alaska Natives

NIAMS continues to lead the Trans-NIH American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Health Communications and Information Workgroup, composed of representatives from 16 NIH ICs. The Workgroup's main purpose is the coordination of efforts in developing and disseminating health information to AI/AN communities. In December 2008 the Workgroup presented a poster at the NIH Health Disparities Summit on its partnership with the Indian Health Service to conduct health information outreach to Community Health Representatives (CHR). CHRs are a group of 1700 tribal employees who live and work in AI/AN communities nationwide and who serve as health educators and patient liaisons.

Public Liaison

NIAMS Coalition Activities

NIAMS continues to work with the NIAMS Coalition to share the latest research advances and related developments, and to foster dialogue on the future path and directions of NIAMS-funded research. The NIAMS Coalition, a group of more than 65 professional and voluntary organizations, leads the Federal Advocacy effort on research into the basic understanding, causes, incidence, treatment and prevention of diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, skin, and connective tissues.

NIAMS Update

The Office of Communications and Public Liaison sends monthly email blasts to Coalition members and other interested stakeholders to provide up-to-date NIAMS-related scientific news, research announcements, meetings, and publications. In an effort to improve communication with key stakeholders, ensure transparency of Institute priorities, and encourage stakeholders to stay abreast of the latest scientific news and resources, the OCPL redesigned its electronic newsletter, the NIAMS Update. Using advanced technology, this NIAMS-branded electronic digest offers readers a more engaging and user-friendly experience with improved graphics and navigation tools. The content has also been expanded to include more information from NIAMS and NIH, as well as to provide additional news and resources from across the Federal government.

Publication Information

The NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center (NRC), which is managed by NIAMS and funded by several NIH Institutes (the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases), the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health, and the DHHS Office on Women's Health, developed a series of 5 colorful fact sheets called Healthy Bones: Why They Matter to highlight risk factors for osteoporosis and provide resources for further health information. The fact sheets have been developed for Hispanics/Latinos (bilingual English/Spanish), African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Chinese Americans (bilingual English/Chinese).

Media Highlights

HealthDay, 10/2/08
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
This feature focused on NIAMS-funded researchers from Johns Hopkins University who discovered that increased fat on the arms and legs was linked to a higher degree of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

US News and World Report, 11/14/08
12 Reasons to Really Quit Smoking
NIAMS resources on smoking and bone health provided the framework for an overview of the skeletal effects of cigarette smoking.

Journal of Investigative Medicine, 12/2008
NIAMS Deputy Director Appointed
The journal included a feature on NIAMS' newly appointed Deputy Director Robert Carter, M.D.

ABC's Private Practice, 12/4/08
NIAMS Director Stephen Katz, M.D., Ph.D., consulted with show writers regarding an upcoming episode on skin cancer. The consultation was facilitated by Hollywood, Health & Society, a program at the USC Annenberg Norman Lear Center.

Science, 12/5/09
Coming Soon to a Knee Near You: Cartilage Like Your Very Own
Rocky Tuan, Ph.D., Chief, Cartilage Biology and Orthopaedics Branch, discussed NIAMS intramural activities related to tissue engineering.

Update on Equal Employment Opportunity . . .

The NIH Summer Internship in Biomedical Research for 2009 is accepting applications via the Web site at http://www.training.nih.gov/student. The Institute is already receiving applications for these positions. For additional information concerning research training opportunities specifically at NIAMS' Intramural Research Program (IRP), please visit http://www.careers.niams.nih.gov.

NIAMS is planning job-shadow days for students from the NIAMS' Adopt-a-Schools: Woodrow Wilson High School's SciMaTech Academy and Wheaton High School's Academy of Biosciences and Medicine. In addition, NIAMS staff members plan to participate as judges at Wilson High School's annual SciMaTech Academy Science Fair in February.

NIH recently celebrated NIH Hispanic Heritage Month. The main event, hosted by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Management, featured Maria Morasso, Ph.D., Principal Investigator in the Developmental Skin Biology Section, NIAMS IRP, presenting, "Quality of Life and Skin Diseases: Skin Development, Hair Formation and Ectodermal Dysplasias." Dr. Morasso was introduced by Dr. Katz. http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/Announcements/2009/Morasso_Hisp_hrtg_mo.asp

Since the last NIAMS Advisory Council, Institute staff participated in the following events:

  • Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) annual conference (October 2008)
  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) annual conference (October 2008)
  • Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) (November 2008)

Upcoming Events . . .

Look for the NIAMS exhibit at the following events between now and the June 2009 issue:

  • NIH Conditioning and Relaxing (CORE) Week, Bethesda, Md., February 9-13, 2009
  • Centers for Disease Control (CDC) 20th National Conference on Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, National Harbor, Md., February 23-24, 2009
  • Dermatology Nurses Association (DNA), San Francisco, Calif., March 4-7, 2009
  • American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), San Francisco, Calif., February 6-10, 2009
  • Joint Conference of the American Society on Aging and the National Council on the Aging, San Francisco, Calif., March 15-19, 2009
  • NBC5 Telemundo Chicago Healthy Lifestyle Expo, Chicago, Ill., March 21-22, 2009
  • American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM), Bethesda, Md., April 15-18, 2009
  • American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), Orlando, Fla., April 17-23, 2009
  • American Geriatrics Society (AGS), Chicago, Ill., April 29-May 3, 2009
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Annual Clinical Meeting, Chicago, Ill., May 2-6, 2009
  • National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON), Tampa, Fla., May 16-20, 2009
  • American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), San Diego, Calif., May 23-28, 2009
  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSP), Seattle, Wash., May 27-30, 2009

Publications . . .

Revised booklets:

Questions and Answers about Juvenile Arthritis (Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Other Forms of Arthritis Affecting Children)
Questions and Answers about Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

New multicultural fact sheets:

Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for African Americans
Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for American Indians and Alaska Natives
Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for Chinese Americans
Healthy Bones: Why They Matter for Hispanics and Latinos

New easy-to-read fact sheet (English):

What Is Raynaud's Phenomenon?

New easy-to-read fact sheets (Spanish):

¿Qué es la dermatitis atópica? (What Is Atopic Dermatitis?)
¿Qué es el dolor de espalda? (What Is Back Pain?)
¿Qué es la epidermólisis ampollosa? (What Is Epidermolysis Bullosa?)
¿Qué es la esclerodermia? (What Is Scleroderma?)
¿Cuáles son los problemas de los hombros? (What Are Shoulder Problems?)
¿Qué es el liquen escleroso? (What Is Lichen Sclerosus?)
¿Cuáles son los problemas de las rodillas? (What Are Knee Problems?)
¿Qué son los trastornos hereditarios del tejido conectivo? (What Are Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue?)
¿Qué es la osteoporosis? (What Is Osteoporosis?)

For information on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases, including copies of the publications listed above, contact:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Information Clearinghouse
National Institutes of Health

1 AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3675
Phone: 301-495-4484
Toll free: 877-22-NIAMS (877-226-4267)
TTY: 301-565-2966
Fax: 301-718-6366
Email: NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov
Website: http://www.niams.nih.gov

If you need more information about available resources in your language or another language, please visit our website or contact the NIAMS Information Clearinghouse at NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov.

For information on osteoporosis and other bone diseases, contact:

NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center

2 AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3676
Phone: 202-223-0344
Toll free: 800-624-BONE (2663)
TTY: 202-466-4315
Fax: 202-293-2356
Email: NIHBoneInfo@mail.nih.gov
Website: http://www.bones.nih.gov

If you need more information about available resources in your language or another language, please visit our website or contact the NIAMS Information Clearinghouse at NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov.

For general information on NIAMS and its research programs, contact:

Office of Science Policy, Planning and Communications
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
National Institutes of Health

Building 31/Room 4C02
31 Center Drive, MSC 2350,
Bethesda, MD 20892-2350
Phone: 301-496-8190
TTY: 301-565-2966
Fax: 301-480-2814
Email: niamsinfo@mail.nih.gov
Website: http://www.niams.nih.gov/

If you need more information about available resources in your language or another language, please visit our website or contact the NIAMS Information Clearinghouse at NIAMSinfo@mail.nih.gov.

For information on NIAMS Research Registries:

NIAMS' research programs include 12 patient research registries. For information on these, please visit: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Funding/Funded_Research/registries.asp.

Compiled by the Office of Communications and Public Liaison, NIAMS; phone: (301) 496-8190; e-mail: NIAMSInfo@mail.nih.gov