NIAMS Labs Faculty

Updated July 9, 2014


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


photo of Dr. Timothy BhattacharyyaTimothy Bhattacharyya, MD
Head, Clinical and Investigative Orthopaedics Surgery Unit
Email: bhattacharyyat@mag toil.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]


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photo of Dr. Rafael CasellasRafael Casellas, PhD
Chief, Laboratory of Molecular Immunogenetics
Adjunct Investigator, NCI
Email: casellar@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. Casellas' lab main goal is to unravel the molecular mechanisms driving early development and peripheral activation of B lymphocytes.


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photo of Dr. Robert ColbertRobert Colbert, MD, PhD
Chief, Pediatric Translational Research Branch
Deputy Clinical Director, NIAMS
Email: colbertr@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The Colbert lab aims to understand the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and its impact on structural remodeling of bone in spondyloarthritic diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis.


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photo of Dr. Massimo GadinaMassimo Gadina PhD
Director, Office of Science and Technology
Chief, Translational Immunology Section
Email: gadinama@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Section website]

Developing accurate and reproducible immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses in patients receiving novel immune therapies and ultimately transitioning these therapies from the clinical trial phase to standard of care. The goal of this section is to develop cutting edge immune monitoring technology.


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photo of Dr. Raphaela Goldbach-ManskyRaphaela Goldbach-Mansky, MD, MHS
Acting Chief, Translational Autoinflammatory Disease Section
Email: goldbacr@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. Goldbach-Mansky's research focuses on applying a systematic approach to the clinical and immunological description of a number of autoinflammatory diseases. The lab uses targeted interventions to understand the role of specific inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of the autoinflammatory diseases.


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photo of Dr. Mark Gourley Mark Gourley, MD
Director, Community Research and Care Branch
Email: gourleym@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Rheumatology Training Program website]

Dr. Gourley's clinical research focuses on pathogenesis and treatment of SLE and autoimmune myositis. He is dedicated for bringing care for rheumatology patients in underserved communities and promoting excellence in rheumatology education.


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photo of Dr. Markus Hafner Markus Hafner, PhD
Head, RNA Molecular Biology Group
Email: markus.hafner@nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. Hafner's group focuses on dissecting the composition of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) involved in cellular RNA transport and control of RNA stability. This is a prerequisite for understanding the consequences of dysregulation and/or mutation of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and/or their target RNA-binding sites in disease.


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photo of Dr. Mariana KaplanMariana Kaplan, MD
Chief, Systemic Autoimmunity Branch
Email: mariana.kaplan@nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. Kaplan's lab focuses on unraveling the fundamental mechanisms that lead to the development and perpetuation of systemic autoimmune disorders, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their associated organ damage.


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photo of Dr. James KatzJames Katz, MD
Chief, Rheumatology Fellowship and Training Branch
Email: james.katz@nih.gov

[Bio], [Rheumatology Training Program website]

Dr. Katz's clinical research is focuses on myositis and SLE. He is passionate about graduate medical education and interested in medical taxonomy.


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photo of Dr. Andrew MammenAndrew Mammen, MD, PhD
Head, Muscle Disease Unit
Email: andrew.mammen@nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. Mammen's research focuses on understanding the fundamental mechanisms of disease in different types of myositis, including dermatomyositis, polymyositis, statin-triggered necrotizing myopathy, and inclusion body myositis. The ultimate goal is to establish more effective treatments for patients with all forms of myositis.


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photo of Dr. Maria MorassoMaria Morasso, PhD
Chief, Laboratory of Skin Biology
Email: morassom@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

We utilize a systematic approach to understand the function of specific regulators and pathways, and a combination of mouse models, toward elucidating the molecular processes that contribute to epidermal differentiation and barrier formation, appendage development and the mechanisms underlying the pathologies of Ectodermal Dysplasias (EDs).


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photo of Dr. Leon NestiLeon Nesti, MD, Ph.D.
Chief, Orthopaedics Research Group
Email: nestil@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The Nesti group focuses on understanding specific orthopaedic pathologies, to better facilitate clinical transition of lab results to medical therapies.


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photo of Dr. John O'SheaJohn O'Shea, MD
Chief, Molecular Immunology and Inflammation Branch
Scientific Director, NIAMS
Email: osheajo@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Dr. O'Shea lab studies how engagement of cytokine receptors transduce signals that, in turn, regulate transcription factors and epigenetic events to modulate gene expression. Another goal is to understand how T cells participate in host defense and contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases.


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photo of Dr. Evelyn RalstonEvelyn Ralston, PhD
Chief, Light Imaging Section
Email: ralstone@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Section website]

Our research focuses on the use of light microscopy techniques to elucidate poorly understood aspects of skeletal muscle cell biology, i.e. the organization of microtubules and their associated subcellular organelles, particularly the Golgi complex. We also strive to apply new modalities of light microscopy to the quantitative analysis of skeletal muscle pathologies.


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photo of Dr. Vittorio SartorelliVittorio Sartorelli, MD
Chief, Laboratory of Muscle Stem Cells and Gene Regulation
Deputy Scientific Director, NIAMS
Email: sartorev@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

We study the cellular and molecular mechanisms subtending specification, differentiation, and regeneration of skeletal muscle cells. We pursue these studies by combining cellular and molecular biological approaches, genomic and proteomic-based systems-biology, bioinformatics, and animal models.


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photo of Dr. Richard SiegelRichard Siegel, MD, PhD
Chief, Autoimmunity Branch
Clinical Director, NIAMS
Email: siegelr@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The Siegel lab explores how alterations in regulatory signaling pathways in immune cells lead to abnormal immune responses, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. The TNF family of cytokines is the main focus of present work, as these cytokines are critical in the pathogenesis and treatment of a number of different autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.


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photo of Dr. Martha SomermanMartha Somerman, DDS, PhD
Chief, Laboratory of Oral Connective Tissue Biology
Director, NIDCR
Email: somermanmj@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The Somerman lab studies the molecular biology of dental-oral-craniofacial development, with a focus on the periodontal complex. We aim to understand cells and signals influencing tooth, bone, and periodontal ligament development in order to identify improved regenerative strategies.


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photo not available of Dr. Stephen StahlStephen Stahl, PhD
Senior Investigator, Protein Expression Laboratory
Email: stahls1@mail.nih.gov

[Bio]

Dr. Stahl uses genetic manipulation techniques on bacteria to design and produce new proteins for research studies. He and his colleagues develop innovative variants of genes, altering nucleotides to tailor genes to express unique proteins in bacteria.


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photo of Dr. Alasdair StevenAlasdair Steven, PhD
Chief, Laboratory of Structural Biology Research
Email: stevena@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The Steven group seeks to elucidate structure-function-assembly relationships of macromolecular complexes by cryo-electron microscopy integrated with other approaches. Systems currently under study include viruses, cytoskeletal filaments, energy-dependent proteases, and amyloid filaments.


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photo of Dr. Michael WardMichael Ward, MD
Acting Chief, Clinical Trials and Outcomes Branch
Email: wardm1@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

Our group studies health outcomes and outcome measures in patients with rheumatic diseases.


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photo of Dr. Richard SiegelPaul Wingfield, PhD
Chief, Protein Expression Laboratory
Email: wingfiep@mail.nih.gov

[Bio], [Lab website]

The NIAMS Protein Expression Laboratory, led by Dr. Wingfield, supports intramural NIH scientists in studying the structure and function of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) proteins. Most structural biology techniques, especially those for studying the three-dimensional structures of proteins, require large quantities of highly purified, monodisperse, and correctly folded proteins.


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