News & Events

NIAMS Update December 2015

NIH NIAMS NIAMS
Update
An online resource for the NIAMS Coalition, Council, and Colleagues
December 17, 2015

The NIAMS Update is produced and distributed monthly by the NIAMS Office of Science Policy, Planning and Communications. It is an online resource for the NIAMS Coalition, Council and Colleagues.

Spotlight

Letter from Stephen I. Katz: Reaffirming Our Mission With Our NIAMS Coalition Colleagues

 Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D

Recently, I had the opportunity to connect with many of our NIAMS Coalition members at our biennial Outreach and Education Day. The NIAMS Coalition, a consortium of more than 90 professional and voluntary organizations concerned with the Institute's programs, are key partners in carrying out our mission. Their areas of interest closely align with ours, and we rely on them to help further public understanding about diseases and conditions of the bones, joints, muscles and skin. We host Outreach and Education Day to provide a forum for our Coalition members to learn more about the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NIAMS programs, and to learn from each other as well. A full summary of this year's meeting is available here.

Read more.

Image: Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D.

News

Study Identifies Protein Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

person in a wheelchair

Using a large-scale technological approach, a team of researchers has uncovered several dozen proteins that could serve as biomarkers for the muscle-wasting disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This discovery may lead to the development of a biomarker-based blood test that would help doctors assess the status of a patient and the effectiveness of treatment approaches. The study, a collaborative effort that included scientists from academia, industry and patient advocacy groups, was funded in part by the NIAMS and appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Inflammation Associated With Rheumatoid Arthritis May Persist Even After Clinical Symptoms Ease

White arrows point to areas of intense inflammation (synovitis) in the wrist of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

Joint inflammation caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may continue even after a patient no longer has symptoms, according to a study funded in part by the NIAMS. The study was published in the journal Arthritis Care and Research. Determining whether and when a patient with RA is in remission currently depends on results from standardized clinical assessments and patient reports. Imaging biomarker approaches, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and musculoskeletal ultrasound, are sensitive measures of joint inflammation that can provide additional information, but determining whether to stop or continue with therapies after symptoms subside remains unclear.

Image: White arrows point to areas of intense inflammation (synovitis) in the wrist of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Photo credit: Veena Ranganath, M.D., M.S., University of California, Los Angeles.


FNIH Biomarkers Consortium Study Advances Strategic Imaging and Fluid Biomarkers That Predict Structural Change and Pain Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis External Web Site Policy

x-ray of knee

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) announced the results from a three-year research study that prioritizes and advances the best biological markers (biomarkers) to measure and predict structural changes and treatment responses in osteoarthritis (OA)—one of the most prevalent and disabling diseases in the world. The study was built upon the resources of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, an NIH public-private partnership that was launched in 2002 with funding from the NIAMS, several other NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices, and four major pharmaceutical companies.


NIH Researchers Find Potential Target for Reducing Obesity-Related Inflammation: Study Sheds Light on Preventing or Reversing Certain Obesity-Associated Diseases

Scientists at the NIH, including researchers at the NIAMS, have identified a potential molecular target for reducing obesity-related inflammation. Researchers have known that overeating (i.e., excess calorie consumption) by obese individuals often triggers inflammation, which has been linked to such diseases as asthma and type 2 diabetes. In their study, published recently in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, the investigators found that a protein called SIRT3 provides resistance to this inflammatory response and could potentially prevent or reverse obesity-associated diseases of inflammation.


NIH Director’s Update on the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program

Since September 17, 2015, when I accepted the framework for shaping the Cohort Program as part of implementing the President’s Precision Medicine Initiative, my team has been moving swiftly to lay the foundation for building a national research cohort of 1 million or more volunteers that will expand our understanding of the ways we can improve health and treat disease. I’m excited that the first set of funding opportunities is on the street.


NIH Takes Action To Bolster Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The NIH is strengthening its efforts to advance research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), a disease for which an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment have remained elusive. The actions being taken include launching a research protocol at the NIH Clinical Center to intensely study individuals with ME/CFS and re-invigorating the efforts of the long-standing Trans-NIH ME/CFS Research Working Group with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) as the lead of a multi-institute research effort.


Americans Who Practice Yoga Report Better Wellness, Health Behaviors: Analysis Reveals Reasons for Use of Yoga, Supplements and Spinal Manipulation

People who practiced yoga or took natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) were more likely to do so for wellness reasons than to treat a specific health condition, according to analysis of data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Yoga users reported the most positive health benefits, compared with users of natural products and spinal manipulation. The analysis by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) was published in a National Health Statistics Report by the National Center for Health Statistics.


Dr. Mariana Kaplan Receives Evelyn V. Hess Award

Mariana Kaplan

Mariana Kaplan, M.D., chief of the NIAMS Intramural Research Program’s Systemic Autoimmunity Branch, was selected as the recipient of the 2015 Evelyn V. Hess Award by the Lupus Foundation of America. The award is presented to individuals who have made significant contributions to lupus research, diagnosis and treatment.

NIH Director’s Blog

Building a Better Scaffold for 3D Bioprinting

bioprinted coronary artery

When the heart or another part of the body fails, a transplant is sometimes the only option. Still, the demand for donated organs far outpaces supply, with thousands of people on waiting lists. Furthermore, transplants currently require long-term immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Wouldn’t it be even better to create the needed body part from the individual’s own cells? While it may sound too good to be true, research is moving us closer to the day when it may be possible to use three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to meet some of this demand, as well as address a variety of other biomedical challenges.

Image: A bioprinted coronary artery. Photo credit: Carnegie Mellon University.

Other Federal News

Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) Model Undergoing Testing

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is currently testing the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model in 67 geographic areas throughout the country. The model promotes coordinated, patient-centered care and aims to improve the care experience for the growing numbers of Medicare beneficiaries who receive joint replacements.

New Publications and Products

Spotlight on Scientific Imagery: Lattice Pattern in Tooth Enamel External Web Site Policy

scanning electron microscopy image of lattice pattern in tooth enamel

Enamel is the hardest substance in the body. It protects the surface of the tooth. This scanning electron microscopy image shows the lattice pattern formed by enamel rods, an arrangement that confers strength and flexibility. Genetic mutations affecting enamel formation can result in defects in the thickness, mineralization and/or lattice pattern of the enamel. This can produce weak teeth prone to decay, which in turn can increase other health risks such as systemic infections and heart disease. This photo was selected as a 2015 winner of the BioArt competition of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)External Web Site Policy The photo is courtesy of Olivier Duverger, Ph.D., External Web Site Policy of the NIAMS Laboratory of Skin Biology, and is in the public domain.


A Year of Health: A Guide to a Healthy 2016 for You and Your Family

2016 A Year of Health Planner

A Year of Health: A Guide to a Healthy 2016 for You and Your Family health planners are available from the NIAMS. This FREE 12-month resource is created for four different cultural groups, and it offers tips and information on health issues related to bones, joints, muscles and skin. Fill out the order form and email it to the NIAMS Clearinghouse to get up to 150 free health planners for your community.


NIAMS Clinical Trials in Bethesda Currently Recruiting

The NIAMS and other NIH Institutes are currently recruiting for studies involving lupus, vasculitis and other diseases. More information about clinical trials is found on clinicaltrials.gov.


NIH Health Information Spanish Portal

Hispanic couple smiling

The NIH Office of the Director has launched a Spanish-language health information website, Portal de Información de Salud de NIH. The mobile-friendly site presents evidence-based health information from NIH Institutes and Centers, articles from NIH News in Health, and information about clinical trials from the Clinical Research Trials and You website. The site also features a health information navigator feature, Ask Carla (Pregunta a Carla). The new website also links to the NIAMS Spanish-language portal.


Voices of the NIH: Overcoming Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI)

screencap of video

Sharing Our Stories: Voices of the NIH Community was developed in partnership with StoryCorps, a national oral history project, to capture the stories of those who have been impacted by the NIH. This story involves Kristal Nemeroff, a young woman with OI who has been coming to the NIH since she was 8 months old. Now 26, Kristal talks with one of her NIH physicians, Dr. Scott Paul, about her disease and how he helped her get into a vocational rehabilitation program and attend college to become a registered nurse.


U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Final Research Plan: Screening To Prevent Osteoporotic Fractures External Web Site Policy

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force External Web Site Policy, an independent, volunteer panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine, posted a final research plan on screening to prevent osteoporotic fractures.


NIH Research Matters

NIH Research Matters is a review of NIH research from the Office of Communications and Public Liaison, Office of the Director, NIH.


Gene Therapy Treats Muscular Dystrophy in Dogs

dog sitting in wheelchair

Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 genetic conditions that break down the muscles that control body movement and heart contraction. The most common type is Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which primarily affects boys. Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of delivering body-wide gene therapy to dogs with muscular dystrophy. The findings provide insights on potential treatments for people with muscular dystrophy.

Photo credit: morningmagenta/iStock/Thinkstock.


NIH News in Health

Read practical health information in NIH News in Health, which is reviewed by the NIH’s medical experts and is based on research conducted either by the NIH’s own scientists or by its grantees at universities and medical schools around the country.


Keep Your Skin Healthy: Protecting Your Outer Self

skin care

People say that beauty’s only skin deep; it’s what’s on the “inside” that counts. Our insides are certainly important, but skin is your first layer of defense against the outside world. Skin can also give important clues to your overall health. Learn to take good care of your skin, so your skin can keep taking good care of you.

Meetings

February NIAMS Advisory Council Meeting

The NIAMS Advisory Council Meeting will be held February 2, 2016, in Building 31, 6th Floor, C Wing, Conference Room 6, NIH Campus. A meeting agenda will be posted as soon as it is available. The Council meeting will be available for live viewing via the NIH videocasting service as well.

NIAMS Advisory Council Meeting

NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The NIH’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series offers weekly lectures every Wednesday at 3 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Campus. Renowned scientists from around the globe present research on a variety of topics. The lectures are Continuing Medical Education-certified, open to the public and available live via webcast.

NIH Science Lectures and Events Available via Internet

The NIH hosts a number of science seminars and events that are available online through real-time streaming video. An event can be watched at your convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable podcast. Most events are available to all; a few are broadcast for NIH or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and are marked as such. See additional details on events.

Funding Announcements

NIAMS Announcements

Clinical Sites for the IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network (UG1)

RFA-OD-16-001
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Data Coordinating and Operations Center for the IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network (U24)

RFA-OD-16-002
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes: Patient Reported Outcomes Research Resource Center Core (ECHO PRO Core) (U24)

RFA-OD-16-003
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Pediatric Cohorts (UG3/UH3)

RFA-OD-16-004
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Data Analysis Center (U24)

RFA-OD-16-005
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Coordinating Center (U2C)

RFA-OD-16-006
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PAR-15-165 “NIAMS Clinical Trial Implementation Cooperative Agreement (U01)”

(NOT-AR-16-010)

NIH Common Fund Initiative Announcements

Pre-application: Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Comprehensive Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs (OT1)

(RFA-RM-15-003)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: Not applicable 
Application Receipt Dates: Applications are accepted bimonthly on or around the 15th of the month.

Limited Competition - Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Comprehensive Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs (OT2)

(RFA-RM-15-018)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: Not applicable 
Application Receipt Date: New and Resubmission applications are accepted on the date specified in the Invitation to Submit after successful competition of the corresponding OT1 application.

Pre-application: Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Foundational Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs (OT1)

(RFA-RM-15-019)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: Not applicable 
Application Receipt Date: January 15, 2016

Limited Competition - Stimulating Peripheral Activity to Relieve Conditions (SPARC): Foundational Functional Mapping of Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology of Organs (OT2)

(RFA-RM-15-020)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: Not applicable 
Application Receipt Date: New applications are accepted on the date specified in the Invitation to Submit after successful competition of the corresponding OT1 application.

NIH Director’s Early Independence Awards (DP5)

(RFA-RM-15-006)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: December 29, 2015
Application Receipt Date: January 29, 2016

Metabolomics Data Analysis (R03)

(RFA-RM-15-021)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: January 11, 2016
Application Receipt Date: February 11, 2016

SBIR/STTR Commercialization Readiness Pilot (CRP) Program: Technical Assistance and Late Stage Development (SB1)

(PAR-16-027)
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: 30 days prior to the application due date
Application Receipt Dates: Standard dates apply

Request for Information (RFI): Inviting Comments and Suggestions on the Priorities specified for the NIH-wide Rehabilitation Research Plan

(NOT-HD-15-032)


Other Funding Announcements

Implementing Rigor and Transparency in NIH and AHRQ Research Grant Applications

(NOT-OD-16-011)

Announcement of NIH Plans for the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program

(NOT-OD-16-015)

Notice of Participation of the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs in PA-15-258 “Administrative Supplements for Research on Dietary Supplements (Admin Supp)”

(NOT-OD-16-016)

Significant Changes: FY 2016 NIH Grants Policy Statement

(NOT-OD-16-017)

Request for Information (RFI): Soliciting Input for the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) FY 2016–2020 Strategic Plan

(NOT-OD-16-018)

Advance Notice: NIH Plans to Implement the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) Requirements Beginning January 1, 2016

(NOT-OD-16-019)

ASSIST Now an Option for Fellowship Grant Applications

(NOT-OD-16-023)

Notice of Intent to Publish Request for Information: Strategies to Increase Diversity in the Physician-Scientist Workforce

(NOT-OD-16-024)

Limited Competition: Exposure Analysis Services for the Environmental Influences on Children's Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program (Admin Supplement)

PA-16-046
Letter of Intent Receipt Date: March 15, 2016
Application Receipt Date: April 15, 2016

If you would like to review information about funding opportunities more frequently than our monthly updates allow, see the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, the primary source for information about NIH funding opportunities. You can also request a weekly Table of Contents from the NIH Guide.

Read More At NIAMS